Praise, probe and pick apart

In Letters to the Editor

Loving the Greens

Dear Editor,

I just wanted to say how thrilled I was to see the story about
Peter Camejo by Darren McCrea.

Please let him know that. The interview shed light on the other
parties running. Hopefully, we will see more stories like this.

Raquel Saboor, CSUF student

I vote for MTV

Dear Editor,

I agree with most of Rudy Gharib’s article, but have a few
comments to make, in no particular order.

First of all, it was the MTV Music Video Awards, not the MTV Movie
Awards that the daughters of the presidential candidates appeared
on recently. Second, how is encouraging people to vote enforcing
“democracy by the use of undemocratic methods”?

Third, I don’t remember it ever being “cool to be
politically apathetic,” unless maybe if you’re in grade
school, in which case you’d be too young to vote.

William Ngo, CSUF graduate student, communications

Dear Editor,

Being a student, I am sure a lot of people can relate to me when I
say I am just too busy to keep up with the daily news. Thankfully
though, I have the Daily Titan.

On Sept. 22, 2004, I read articles that triggered me to write.

One of the articles titled “U.S. gives Israel smart
bombs” talked about how the United States is selling Israel
nearly 5,000 smart bombs. The U.S. Defense Security Cooperation
Agency says that the sale “will contribute to the foreign
policy and national security of the United States by helping to
improve the security of a friendly country that has been and
continues to be an important force for political stability and
economic progress in the Middle East.”

This is by far one of the stupidest statements I have ever
heard.

First off, Israel is far from a “friendly country” and
Israel does not help the Middle East have “political
stability” and “economic progress.” On the
contrary, Israel causes more political problems than there needs to
be in the Middle East and the only economy it helps is its own.
Israel also says that the bombs would not be used against
Palestinians. All I have to say to that is bull.

By the U.S. selling weapons to Israel, they are only encouraging
war in the Middle East. If the U.S. wants to help the Middle East
have “political stability” they need to stop selling
weapons to a country that already has many weapons (and should not
have them in the first place) and actually increase their efforts
toward peace.

A second article that caught my attention was titled “Midwest
Airlines cancels flight.” It is shocking to me that an
airline cancels a flight just because a passenger found
“Arabic-style handwriting” in one of the in-flight
magazines. The airline spokeswoman, Carol Skornicka, said that she
has no idea what the writing said but it was similar to a prayer.
My question to that spokeswoman is if she had no idea what it said,
then how the heck would she assume that it was similar to a prayer?
Americans need to stop assuming that everyone who comes from a
Middle-Eastern culture is a terrorist or associated with
terrorists.

The government is just scared that maybe Islam can get people to
open their eyes to what really happens in our country. I have no
idea what our government is trying to do. Instead of focusing on
important issues, they are discriminating toward so many
Muslims.

Some may think I am anti-America. On the contrary, I was born and
raised in America and cannot imagine living anywhere else. I love
America; I just do not like the current government. I commend the
Daily Titan for helping me become more aware than I was before and
for writing such great articles.

Nadia Shah, CSUF student, speech communications

Dear Editor,

The Titan Editorial seemed to dismiss President Bush and the
Republican Party as unrealistic in the last few opinion pieces and
I have to disagree. Optimism overcomes doubt, unites people, and
makes progress.

Think of the highest regarded presidents of the 20th century and
you will come up with Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, John
Kennedy and Ronald Reagan, all of whom were optimists.

Theodore Roosevelt expanded the power of the presidency, Franklin
Roosevelt triumphed through WWII, John Kennedy evaded nuclear
disaster and Ronald Reagan won the Cold War. As columnist Tommy
Purvis pointed out, President Bush is on the verge of making the
Kerry campaign irrelevant. This should be no surprise because that
is what happens to pessimism in times like these: it becomes
irrelevant.

Daniel J. McFawn, CSUF student

Pursuing Purvis

Dear Editor,

It seems that Tommy Purvis has carved out a niche for himself by
taking positions that defy logic.

His Aug. 23 article plainly stated that college students were not
smart enough to think for themselves, and then implied that the
First Amendment did not apply to professors. His latest rant from
Sept. 23 continues this unenviable tradition.

In the History Department, we learn about logical fallacies,
including one called argument ad hominem. This is the act of
changing the focus from the issues you are arguing to the person
you are arguing against by insulting them. John Kerry went wind
surfing—what better measure of his policies?

Making the United Nations irrelevant is not something to be proud
of. We invaded a sovereign nation without provocation, and our last
presidential election was decided not by the voters, but by
unelected judges. Ask the disenfranchised blacks of Florida about
oppression and democracy.

Purvis says President Bush is ready to pull away with the election.
Maybe he is emulating the president by not reading newspapers. I
would not be surprised, however, if the Fox News Channel declared
“Decision 2004” for Bush by the end of this week.

Using “Bush” and “Iraq exit strategy” in
the same sentence without some kind of negation is odd, and I am
not the only one who thinks so. The speech to which Purvis refers
took place on May 24, 2004. I found an article by Gebe Martinez in
The Houston Chronicle from May 25 with the headline “Bush to
‘stay the course,’ but has no exit strategy.” By
the way, I find it juvenile and in poor taste to compare the merit
of exit strategies based on the number of points they contain.

Bush has the smearing of three battle-tested and wounded American
heroes (John McCain, John Kerry and Max Cleland) on his conscience.
If that is the Republican Party’s idea of a campaign, I am
proud that the Democrat’s effort falls short of the
standard.

As far as President Bush running away with the election… we
play the full nine innings at this level, Purvis.

Tell your friends about it. We’ll see you at the debates. The
revolution starts now.

Nicholas Langsdorf, CSUF student, history

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