CSUF should look for a better method to handle its smokers situation

In Opinion

A deep inhale ignites a spark, illuminating the lungs. A heavy breath out brings small white clouds, ready to invade another unsuspecting body.

It becomes symbolic, almost, that with each drag the Cal State University system’s goal of banning cigarette smoking on campus goes up in smoke.

Various areas on campus are still cloaked in cigarette smoke, affecting those who try to avoid it. As Cal State Fullerton’s efforts to thwart smoking on campus have been seemingly ineffective, creating a designated smoking area at CSUF would benefit both those who want to inhale a cigarette and those who don’t want to be anywhere near it.

The CSU Board of Trustees has delegated authority to CSU campus presidents to adopt rules to regulate smoking on campuses.

Under the President’s Directive No. 18, “California State University, Fullerton prohibits smoking in all interior and exterior campus areas and locations,” including any buildings or vehicles on university-owned, leased or rented land, including parking structures and lots.

Recent health studies have prompted the school’s efforts to reduce secondhand smoke, according to the directive.

However, the directive’s failure to enforce its intentions has further doomed the lungs of its students and faculty.

Since the smoking ban was executed in August 2013, student and faculty smokers could be seen convening behind the Humanities building to get their nicotine fix.

Since CSUF’s Facilities Management built a $100,000 brick enclosure, complete with a “SMOKE/VAPE FREE CAMPUS” sign, at the beginning of the fall 2015 semester in the interest of safety and functionality, the new popular smoking section has become the shady trees at the Humanities building facade.

In the interest of everyone’s health, CSUF is in desperate need of a smoking section. Forty million people in the United States are addicted to smoking, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s study, “Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults – United States, 2005-2014.”

Among those, approximately 7 million are smokers between 18 and 24 years old, according to the CDC. Roughly 16.7 percent of smoking Americans are those who fall in the average college age.

As stated under Directive No. 18, “the success of this policy depends on the thoughtfulness, civility and cooperation of all members of the campus community, including visitors.” It also states that accountability for keeping the smoking ban in order ultimately falls on smokers to not light up around campus.

University Police rarely has any involvement in the enforcement of the directive, according to a presentation by University Police Capt. Scot Willey. Trying to confront smokers is an act that could put some people in harm’s way over something small, according to Willey.

“While it’s really important for some people here, it’s not really important to us,” Willey said.

The smoking section should sequester campus smokers into an area that is preferably not in front of a busy building.

Allowing other campus-goers to know exactly which areas of campus to bypass in their attempts to keep away from secondhand smoke.

Once the powers that be open their eyes and accept the truth, then perhaps others can freely open their lungs and enjoy a breath of fresh air.

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  • AudreySilk

    Oh good grief, if you have no fear standing next to an idling car (and you shouldn’t) then your fear about passing someone smoking a cigarette is so outrageously misplaced. Consider further that if you were locked in a garage in with that idling car you’d die on the spot. But lock yourself in a garage with some cigarette smoke and the worst that could happen is you’d have irritation that would pass and not ever be life-threatening.

  • Barb Aucoin

    Wow, Gabe, what are YOU smoking (or injecting)? You want fresh air? You won’t find any where there are motor vehicles, factories, breweries, restaurants, backyard barbeques, etc. Seriously, your Uncle Adolf would just love you as you blindly follow his playbook of “sequestering” people towards nefarious ends. I hope you don’t drink alcohol, aren’t fat, consume sugar or salt; if you don’t understand what that means, then I feel profoundly sorry for you.

  • Connie B

    I disagree with your stance. I was diagnosed with bladder cancer last year. Never having smoked a day in my life I wondered why? Well it was the 2nd hand smoke from my ex from 20 years prior. 2nd hand smoke can cause disease and death if you aren’t careful. I had no clue I had it since it typically hits older men. I like the fact that the campus is smoke free. Yes, I’ve seen those addicted inconsiderate people. I was told to offer them a piece of gum and let them know it’s a smoke free campus. Perhaps having flyers around campus on how to quit would be helpful.

  • It is frightening to think that anti-smoker propaganda is able to implant such irrational fear in some who can be led to believe that a few whiffs of smoke could possibly cause cancer 20 years later! I wonder if they are aware that it has been scientifically shown that smoking tobacco can typically increase brain function by between 10% and 30% – the sort of improvement that many non-smokers could seriously benefit from – if they could only break free from anti-smoker psychological control!
    Some other facts to ponder;

    In 1998 it was confirmed by a large 7 country, 12 centre European study. that passive smoke was BENEFICIAL to children (Boffetta et al). – Much like attenuated deadly viruses used in vaccines could be beneficial to children.

    In 2005 it was confirmed in the Scottish Legal case of McTear v Imperial Tobacco, where all the evidence was examined, that smoking could NOT be proven to cause lung cancer (the alleged signature cancer for smokers).

    Lung cancer has grown to be the BIGGEST cancer killer today despite the massive reduction in smoking and passive smoke exposure.

    In April 2015 it was confirmed by David Kerr, professor of cancer medicine at the University of Oxford that now, ONE in TWO of ALL people currently under 65 yrs old in UK will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives.

    The anti-smoker industry has much money invested in their blinkered dogma and there are too many reputations at risk to acknowledge these facts – So the death toll will continue.

  • bertl

    Brighty and his crazy pro smoking propaganda……

  • How much will you be paid for that repetitive nugget berti?

  • bertl

    One thing is clear, you are definitively not paid by the tobacco lobby, because even they state that smoking kills. Their bosses laugh about your troll postings,

  • Connections with the bosses of the tobacco lobby too! Amazin social and networkin skills u got there berti?

  • Barb Aucoin

    I wonder how Connie B figures that 20 yr old smoke stains on the walls (I guess) entered her urethra and traveled up into her bladder, there to reawaken and thrive for 20 years. Either (1) she’s lying, (2) Or a nutcase), or (3) a lousy housekeeper. Probably all three.

  • Vinny Gracchus

    Designated smoking areas are a better approach.

  • GD

    I don’t know what article you guys read, but he is clearly stating that while smoking is banned on campus, the campus police can’t do anything about it. He simply suggests that they implement smoking sections so that those who would like to avoid smelling it, can.