Kaine loses focus and debate

In Opinion
The first vice presidential debate gave more information than the presidential debate, but interruptions seem to be a trend.  (Courtesy of Wikimedia)
The first vice presidential debate gave more information than the presidential debate, but interruptions seem to be a trend.
(Courtesy of Wikimedia)

In what has been described the past couple days by various headlines as the “debate that the nobody cares about,” the two vice presidential candidates, Donald Trump’s running mate Mike Pence, and Hillary Clinton’s running mate Tim Kaine, had a less entertaining debate than their running mates did last week, but focused on actual information.

Before the debate, Clinton had an 80 percent chance of winning the presidency while Trump was at 20 percent, according to The New York Times.

But after Kaine’s rocky retorts, that cushion Clinton theoretically sat upon is bound to break.

Kaine spoke first and was eloquently able to get his point across about how strong he and Clinton would be as a team. On the other hand, Pence was vague about how he and Trump would do well in office, mainly focusing on his own validations.

However, the tables quickly turned when Kaine made his first interruption, of many, within seconds of Pence’s answer.

“You guys love Russia,” Kaine bursted out first, then continued this pattern a handful of times throughout the speech, citing Vladimir Putin as the poster boy to Trump’s dogma.

After that, Kaine never seemed to stop trying to get a word in, as if he was afraid that Pence would finally answer some of the questions that Trump and Clinton left out last week.

While Pence stayed cool, calm and collected, he attempted to solidify himself as VP, meanwhile Kaine’s allotted time was apparently not enough to get his critiques across.

“Elaine, if I could– if I could jump in,” and “Elaine, can I,” “Elaine, let me — let me…” all coming from Kaine were met by moderator, Elaine Quijano’s frustrated comments, “We will get to that senator,” according to The Washington Post’s transcript.

With both candidates talking at the same time, it was hard to deduce their arguments. However when Kaine’s voice was finally heard, his points didn’t line up.

To which came the most beautifully ironic statement of the night, “We will never, ever engage in a risky scheme,” Kaine said. Apparently, Kaine didn’t get the memo that Clinton’s weak spot with voter’s is the email controversy she’s been fighting for months.

While Pence continued to brandish his grassroots past and fantasize about the beautiful “Eutopia” that Trump is planning on making, he seems to be a better presidential candidate than Trump himself, if temperament is anything to go off of.

He seems like an ideal leader and one who can find an efficient balance of equivocating the public while keeping this nice demeanor that we’ve come to love from President Barack Obama. Pence has been taking notes from Trump on what not to do.

It almost seems as if Kaine had taken debating advice from Trump instead of Clinton. The amount of interruptions he committed nearly trumped the 34 interruptions made by Trump during the presidential debate.

While Kaine was told to “stop” by Quijano, a fantastically dramatic amount of times, Pence continued to answer the questions presented as well as politically possible.

Though they were both interrupted by each other a good amount of times, the two vice presidential candidates were allowed to flesh out an acceptable number of positions in the hour and a half they were given.

While the presidential debate was disappointingly lacking in the number of topics covered, this debate surprisingly seemed to give a better view of the presidential candidates than they themselves did last week.

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