workaholic

(Rebecca Mena / Daily Titan)

Finding a job that fuels one’s vanity is the chance of a lifetime. The drive to remain in that career and put in the right amount of sweat, love and tears can lead to numerous connections that lead to success. While striving to be the top dog in an industry and taking on the bragging rights that come with it may sound appealing, no success comes without sacrifice.

Workaholics are more common in America than some may think. In a 2017 study by business blogger Brandon Gaille, over 10 million people work an average of over 60 hours per week. That’s 20 hours more than the average full-time work week for an adult.

While being able to work restlessly and passionately is an admirable trait, too much of a good thing can turn into an obnoxious display, especially when the workaholic is in a leadership position.

If a leader is visibly distressed by taking on more than they can chew, their employees may follow suit. Additionally, when leaders begin to do the tasks that are best suited for their employees, expectations will start to rise as respect diminishes.

Whether the burnout affects the boss or the employee, high-stress levels in the workplace will harm anyone they touch. Any victim of high-stress will start to experience the tell-tale side-effects of declining mental and physical health.

According to an article by Corporate Wellness Magazine ? a publication by a non-profit group dedicated to spreading the word on maintaining well-being in corporate spaces ? there are many risks that a worker can run into: cardiovascular diseases, immune deficiency disorders, substance abuse and mental health disorders.

A 12-year follow-up study done in the UK shows that chronic work stress is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). The study found heart disease to be more evident among stressed workers under the age of 50. These individuals were reported to have a 68% higher chance of developing CHD than those who report experiencing little stress at work.

Another aspect of a worker’s life that can be damaged by excessive labor is their love life.

Of course, getting accustomed to the balance of a relationship with a demanding job is not an overnight process. It takes time to develop a routine for anything, especially when it comes to a personal romantic life.

Eventually, the timeline for that process comes to an end and tensions start to rise between partners who do not set their priorities straight. In the same study by the business blogger mentioned earlier, the reported divorce rate among individuals who identify as workaholics runs at 55%.

More often than not, people who devote most of their time and energy to their jobs do not put the same amount of work into their relationships. One partner may start to feel jealous and out of place in their significant other’s life. A strain will start developing as arguments cause butting-heads about who and what is more important, consequently leading them to believe that there is someone better out there and cut ties.

Let’s be honest, no one wants to deal with the pain of heartbreak, and coworkers especially do not want to deal with the uncomfortable feeling of patting the crying person’s back and whispering, “There, there.”

When life starts to crumble around them, workaholics should wake up to their alarms and consider how much they are investing in their careers, especially when it is not benefiting them in the long-run. Those alarms are calling for redefining goals and recognize that their efforts should be put into maintaining their health and relationship, rather than playing the hero by taking the workload off their coworkers.

Rather than stay at the office and finish up some work that won’t matter in a few years, a workaholic should learn to walk away from the desk, turn off the eye-straining white lights and start planning a vacation that will stay in family photo books forever.

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